Category Archives: arts integration

Arts integration is an approach to teaching. Students create and demonstrate understanding through an art form.

Don’t Reform, Transform

Teaching and learning should be playful, social, creative, active, and exciting. Students and teachers ought to be champing at the bit to return to “school” the next day, filled with the possibilities of what may evolve from their latest explorations. “Going to school” ought to be the most fun job in the world. Why can’t it be? Continue reading

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EduSpeak: Nonlinguistic Processing

Robert Marzano writes about something he calls “representing knowledge nonlinguistically.” He fails to note, however, that integrating the arts into the classroom results in this type of mental processing by its very nature. Sometimes it’s hard to see what’s right in front of your face. Continue reading

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A Quiet Month…

Well, not really. That is, I’ve been quiet in the blogosphere but life has been anything but. A flurry of summer teacher institutes and, now, a summer kids’ camp on “The Art of Physics” has occupied me more than fully, … Continue reading

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Where’s the Joy?

Teachers have given up their power and are facing “burnout” due to our insistence on holding them accountable for student test scores. Approaching the art of teaching more like a creative process and less like a set of rules to follow can lead to not only better, but more joyful teaching and learning for everyone. Continue reading

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Safety and Risk

Playful risk-taking is at the heart of learning, and teachers have to become experts at creating a safe environment for students to experience discovery and invention. The challenge is to build a chain of successes that lead students to create beautifully crafted and meaningful work. Continue reading

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Mind Good, Body Bad

[manuscript excerpt] Back in the Renaissance, some pretty smart people did some pretty deep thinking, and mostly we have a lot to thank them for. Of course, they based their theories on Greek philosophy, which didn’t always lead them in … Continue reading

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Making Choices is the Key

The crucial element of the arts integration approach to teaching is student choice. In creating their own individual and collaborative works of art, students grapple with real-world decisions to imbue their creations with meaning. Dance does this better than anything else, because it involves the entire being, physical, intellectual, emotional, and spiritual. Continue reading

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Only Two Kinds of Dancers

Americans have many preconceptions about dance, most of them due to a lack of exposure to the art form. Both trained and untrained dancers can participate in a form of dance that combines all that has gone before and promises a healthier, better-educated society. Continue reading

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Ancient Becomes Modern

What do we know of humanity’s first schools? From our study of primal cultures, we know that we first make sense of the universe by dancing, singing, dramatizing, and crafting visual representations of complex truths. “Back to the basics” takes on new meaning when we look at it this way. Continue reading

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Classroom Choreography (SM) blog launched!

This blog is dedicated to discussions of dance integration in the classroom: in other words, exploring the tools and techniques of dance-making to drive learning in classrooms. The posts in this blog, and the comments, will be used in the … Continue reading

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